Raspberry (Rubus idaeus)

Last night’s effort…

Picture it...

Raspberries and a molecule of raspberry ketone (4-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one) in a mortar, with the pestle lying next to it. Raspberries and a molecule of raspberry ketone (4-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one) in a mortar, with the pestle lying next to it.

In the UK and most of Western Europe, our traditional autumn recipes are dominated by apples, blackberries and later pears, but the autumn-fruiting cultivars of raspberries, such as Rubus idaeus ‘Autumn Bliss’ have also withstood all that your average British summer could throw at them and appear bright red, like little burlesque dancers, in the fading colours of the productive garden. So “blow a raspberry” to all the more exotic fruit marketed (often misleadingly) as “Superfood” and pay homage to this potent little package of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre.

1. The main picture shows a few raspberries in a mortar, together with the pestle lying next to it, as well as a molecule of raspberry ketone, the compound giving rise to the characteristic aroma of raspberries and other berries. Mortar and…

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