And in the post today…

Look what just arrived in the post – the (LEGO-)game changing Female Sientist (more about that here) and the whimsical Chicken Suit Guy. I may have confessed to a colleague that I have a soft spot for the whimsy of LEGO minifigures and wanted these for my blogs, and he actually procured and sent them. How cool is that?

LEGO Minifigures: Female Scientist and Chicken Suit Guy

LEGO Minifigures: Female Scientist and Chicken Suit Guy


Office Move

All books and boxes hav been moved, but where am I going to put everything?

All books and boxes have been moved, but where am I going to put everything?

The contact directory doesn’t seem to have updated itself yet, so a quick note via the blog: I have moved from an office in the Centre for Computational Chemistry (W236) into one in the Synthetic Chemistry Building (N423), phone extension number has stayed the same.

It all fits (well, nearly, there are still thins some of the previous occupants need to collect). But the important thing is that the computer is up and running again.

It all fits (well, nearly, there are still thins some of the previous occupants need to collect). But the important thing is that the computer is up and running again.

There was a stage on Friday where I wasn’t sure all my accumulated stuff would fit in, but, as the photo shows, it all worked out in the end. And as if on cue, the hot air balloons came by to highlight the superior view.

Balloons over Cabot Tower

Balloons over Cabot Tower

 

Who can be uncheered with a balloon?

Who can be uncheered with a balloon?

 

 


Plants in the Garden – a Summer Holiday Post

Picture it...

As our posts so far have shown, even a domestic garden can supply many plants with interesting chemical compounds, but this time, let’s see how the professionals do it – Picture It… Chemistry goes outdoors to the University of Bristol Botanic Garden. (This is the Picture It… Chemistry contribution to the #ChemTravelCarnival suggested by Brandon Findlay over on Chemtips.)

In a departure from our usual format, Natalie has taken her camera to the University of Bristol Botanic Garden to focus on plants that have found medicinal and culinary uses. We plan to explore some of these in greater detail in the future, so for now there are many pictures and just a few links,* mostly to the relevant Wikipedia pages** for plants and key compounds, to get you interested.

The beds collecting representatives of different plant families hold, among many others, the Solanaceae, colloquially known as the…

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